Posts tagged working

theatlantic:

Why Women Prefer Working Together (and Why Men Prefer Working Alone)

One of the puzzles of the persistent gender wage gap is why women are highly overrepresented in certain fields, like the nonprofit sector, and hugely underrepresented in other fields, like financial institutions and executive positions in major companies. One reasonable question to ask about the gap is: How much should we blame “the system” (i.e.: clubby nepotism, sexism, lack of paternity leave) and how much should we chalk this up to women’s decisions (i.e.: leaning out in their late 20s and choosing careers that pay less even when they had options to earn more).
Peter J. Kuhn and Marie-Claire Villeval wade into this contentious field with a new study: "Are Women More Attracted to Cooperation Than Men?" The short answer is, well, yes. The more complex answer is: Yes, because men demonstrate more overconfidence in their own abilities and distrust in their colleagues’ aptitude, except under key situations.
Read more. [Image: AnnieAnniePancake/Flickr]


In the battle of the sexes, women have certain characteristics that make them better leaders, like the study cited by The Atlantic above.
Here are five additional ways that women are more effective bosses than men, and tips on how everyone—men and women—can improve their leadership skills.

theatlantic:

Why Women Prefer Working Together (and Why Men Prefer Working Alone)

One of the puzzles of the persistent gender wage gap is why women are highly overrepresented in certain fields, like the nonprofit sector, and hugely underrepresented in other fields, like financial institutions and executive positions in major companies. One reasonable question to ask about the gap is: How much should we blame “the system” (i.e.: clubby nepotism, sexism, lack of paternity leave) and how much should we chalk this up to women’s decisions (i.e.: leaning out in their late 20s and choosing careers that pay less even when they had options to earn more).

Peter J. Kuhn and Marie-Claire Villeval wade into this contentious field with a new study: "Are Women More Attracted to Cooperation Than Men?" The short answer is, well, yes. The more complex answer is: Yes, because men demonstrate more overconfidence in their own abilities and distrust in their colleagues’ aptitude, except under key situations.

Read more. [Image: AnnieAnniePancake/Flickr]

In the battle of the sexes, women have certain characteristics that make them better leaders, like the study cited by The Atlantic above.

Here are five additional ways that women are more effective bosses than men, and tips on how everyone—men and women—can improve their leadership skills.

Believe it or not, there are times when doing nothing is the most productive thing you can do. Here are eight of them:
1. When you’re getting angry.
2. When you find yourself obsessively twiddling with your phone.
3. When you’re getting ready for bed.
4. When you’re burned out.
5. When you get an email.
6. When you’re asked to make a rush decision.
7. When you hit a tech snafu.
8. When you’re spinning your wheels.
Next time you’re faced with a full inbox, confrontational employee or buzzing smartphone, do nothing … and see how your work improves.
(via OPEN Forum)

Believe it or not, there are times when doing nothing is the most productive thing you can do. Here are eight of them:

1. When you’re getting angry.

2. When you find yourself obsessively twiddling with your phone.

3. When you’re getting ready for bed.

4. When you’re burned out.

5. When you get an email.

6. When you’re asked to make a rush decision.

7. When you hit a tech snafu.

8. When you’re spinning your wheels.

Next time you’re faced with a full inbox, confrontational employee or buzzing smartphone, do nothing … and see how your work improves.

(via OPEN Forum)

bizweekgraphics:

Hey FATTIES!
A little Vargas/Daniel can’t be missed in this week’s issue.

Did you know that 55% of employees consider themselves overweight? This infographic sheds light (not pounds) on the direct correlation between weight and unhealthy living with working in an office environment. 

bizweekgraphics:

Hey FATTIES!

A little Vargas/Daniel can’t be missed in this week’s issue.

Did you know that 55% of employees consider themselves overweight? This infographic sheds light (not pounds) on the direct correlation between weight and unhealthy living with working in an office environment. 

Click here to embiggen (see full infographic)

When you are feeling overloaded, instead of pushing harder, a wise thing to do might be to take a short break … Short breaks can revive your productivity and decrease tension. We looked deeper into the matter and put together some interesting facts, as well as practical advice on how to stay fresh and productive throughout the day. 

(Via Visual.ly)

Click here to embiggen (see full infographic)

When you are feeling overloaded, instead of pushing harder, a wise thing to do might be to take a short break … Short breaks can revive your productivity and decrease tension. We looked deeper into the matter and put together some interesting facts, as well as practical advice on how to stay fresh and productive throughout the day. 

(Via Visual.ly)

Are your employees struggling with their work? Here are 4 tactics to revive their excitement:
1. Lead with Behavior
2. Eliminate Judgement
3.  Ask Solution-Oriented Questions
4. Give Them Ownership
Read more on OPEN Forum on the 4 Ways to Motivate Detached Employees.

Are your employees struggling with their work? Here are 4 tactics to revive their excitement:

1. Lead with Behavior

2. Eliminate Judgement

3.  Ask Solution-Oriented Questions

4. Give Them Ownership

Read more on OPEN Forum on the 4 Ways to Motivate Detached Employees.

Goodbye 100-Hour Workweek: Why Working 9 to 5 is Better for Business on OPEN Forum
Here’s how working 9 to 5 (or another 40-hour-a-week schedule) can help you and your business succeed:
1. Helps you avoid burnout
2. Increases employee retention
3. Showcases company values
4. Boosts productivity
5. Forces delegation
6. Makes more financial sense
7. Understands the long-term goal
How can you get started? Read more here and try to work eight hours for one day instead of your usual 10 to 15. Focus only on the things that really need to get done. You will be surprised how productive you can be on a limited amount of time.

Goodbye 100-Hour Workweek: Why Working 9 to 5 is Better for Business on OPEN Forum

Here’s how working 9 to 5 (or another 40-hour-a-week schedule) can help you and your business succeed:

1. Helps you avoid burnout

2. Increases employee retention

3. Showcases company values

4. Boosts productivity

5. Forces delegation

6. Makes more financial sense

7. Understands the long-term goal

How can you get started? Read more here and try to work eight hours for one day instead of your usual 10 to 15. Focus only on the things that really need to get done. You will be surprised how productive you can be on a limited amount of time.

fastcompany:

Busy Is The New Lazy

If you’re telling everybody that you’re busy all the time, it’s time to rethink your ideas about productivity.

So why do we keep doing all this humblebragging about how busy we are? It’s a question Choi investigates thoughtfully: She observes that people who are “legitimately occupied” with work or family rarely play the “too busy” card (clearly, we don’t know the same people)—or, may even go out of their way to make a connectionbecause they’ve been so swamped.
To Choi, when we say “busy,” we’re really trying to say something else—although what exactly that might be depends on the harried soul that’s complaining.
She supplies some translations:
I’m busy = I’m important.Being busy gives people a sense they’re needed and significant, Choi says. It’s also a sign saying that you’re about to be on-ramped into somebody’s misguided ego trip.
I’m busy = I’m giving you an excuse.Saying that you’re busy is a handy way to outsource your responsibility to your irresponsibility. Since you’re always distracted, you don’t have to do anything for anybody.
I’m busy = I’m afraid.Look above at the “I’m important” part. Whether the speaker knows it or not, complaining of busyness is a subtle cry for help, one that reassures us that yes, we are in demand.

In this way, busyness functions as a kind of laziness. When we fill our schedules with appointments and hands with phones, we divest ourselves of downtime. When we’re endlessly doing, it’s hard to be mindful of what we’re doing.

How to eradicate busyness
Of course, it’s a interdependent issue. It’s hard to have downtime if your bosses subscribe to what Anne Marie Slaughter calls our time macho culture, “a relentless competition to work harder, stay later, pull more all-nighters, travel around the world and bill the extra hours that the international date line affords you.”
But don’t let that excuse suffice. You can convince your bosses—if you know how to approach the conversation.
Busyness is Not a Virtue
Read the full story here.

fastcompany:

Busy Is The New Lazy

If you’re telling everybody that you’re busy all the time, it’s time to rethink your ideas about productivity.

So why do we keep doing all this humblebragging about how busy we are? It’s a question Choi investigates thoughtfully: She observes that people who are “legitimately occupied” with work or family rarely play the “too busy” card (clearly, we don’t know the same people)—or, may even go out of their way to make a connectionbecause they’ve been so swamped.

To Choi, when we say “busy,” we’re really trying to say something else—although what exactly that might be depends on the harried soul that’s complaining.

She supplies some translations:

I’m busy = I’m important.
Being busy gives people a sense they’re needed and significant, Choi says. It’s also a sign saying that you’re about to be on-ramped into somebody’s misguided ego trip.

I’m busy = I’m giving you an excuse.
Saying that you’re busy is a handy way to outsource your responsibility to your irresponsibility. Since you’re always distracted, you don’t have to do anything for anybody.

I’m busy = I’m afraid.
Look above at the “I’m important” part. Whether the speaker knows it or not, complaining of busyness is a subtle cry for help, one that reassures us that yes, we are in demand.

In this way, busyness functions as a kind of laziness. When we fill our schedules with appointments and hands with phones, we divest ourselves of downtime. When we’re endlessly doing, it’s hard to be mindful of what we’re doing.

How to eradicate busyness

Of course, it’s a interdependent issue. It’s hard to have downtime if your bosses subscribe to what Anne Marie Slaughter calls our time macho culture, “a relentless competition to work harder, stay later, pull more all-nighters, travel around the world and bill the extra hours that the international date line affords you.”

But don’t let that excuse suffice. You can convince your bosses—if you know how to approach the conversation.

Busyness is Not a Virtue

Read the full story here.

8 Habits of Remarkably Successful People
The most successful people in business work differently. See what they do—and why it works.
1. They don’t create backup plans.2. They do the work…3. …and they work a lot more.4. They avoid the crowds.5. They start at the end…6. …and they don’t stop there.7. They sell.8. They are never too proud.Read More 
(via 8 Habits of Remarkably Successful People | Inc.com)

8 Habits of Remarkably Successful People

The most successful people in business work differently. See what they do—and why it works.

1. They don’t create backup plans.
2. They do the work…
3. …and they work a lot more.
4. They avoid the crowds.
5. They start at the end…
6. …and they don’t stop there.
7. They sell.
8. They are never too proud.
Read More 

(via 8 Habits of Remarkably Successful People | Inc.com)