Posts tagged women entrepreneurs

Emily McDowell, the woman behind this viral Valentine’s Day card shares the huge loss that pushed her out of the corporate world and into her 

After I graduated, I moved back to San Francisco to take my first agency job. By 2011, I had worked my way up to the creative-director level and was living in Los Angeles. But part of me always knew this wasn’t quite what I wanted. I was good at it, but it felt like I was always chasing the next promotion or campaign or award to make it feel better. Over time, I became less wide-eyed and excited about it.

Was there something that pushed you to think differently about what you could do instead?

In 2011, one of my best friends, my college roommate, was diagnosed with cancer and passed away a few months later. I then had a wake-up call that I hadn’t experienced 10 years earlier with my own illness. My friend had been so vibrant and lived according to her own values and beliefs. And I knew that to honor her and myself, I needed to live a more authentic life.

Read more about how McDowell became her own boss on OPEN Forum.

Women entrepreneurs like Alexis Maybank of Gilt explain how they found the mentors who helped shape their career paths.

Women Launch 1,200 New Businesses a Day

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You guys. 1,200 new businesses a day? That’s up from an average of 740 a day in 2013! This is just one of the many statistics that have us excited about the state of women entrepreneurs:

  • There are now 9.1 million women-owned businesses in the United States.
  • These women-run firms generate more than $1.4 trillion in revenue.
  • Women employ more than 7.8 million people.

For more insights into the State of Women-Owned Businesses, read our report.

Sarika Doshi, a co-founder of the fashion and beauty website Rank & Style, shared some insight into how she launched her company while still working a full-time job:

It was a lot of work. I was working at a legal startup that was doing really interesting things, and I was learning so much, so it really wasn’t a drag. Basically I would work during the day, and then Pooja and Sonal would come over at night. We would order food and then start our second shift, building Rank & Style. It was like being in full-on final exam mode all the time. I would usually take Saturday off, but that was it.
How did you know when it was the right time to quit your job and dive in?
I was dedicated to getting my savings account to a certain place before quitting. That, and I wanted to get funded before launching. I know that isn’t traditional for a lot of risk-taking entrepreneurs, but I think everyone needs to do their own math. We ended up raising $500,000 right before we launched.

Learn more about Doshi and her company, Rank & Style, on OPEN Forum.

Sarika Doshi, a co-founder of the fashion and beauty website Rank & Style, shared some insight into how she launched her company while still working a full-time job:

It was a lot of work. I was working at a legal startup that was doing really interesting things, and I was learning so much, so it really wasn’t a drag. Basically I would work during the day, and then Pooja and Sonal would come over at night. We would order food and then start our second shift, building Rank & Style. It was like being in full-on final exam mode all the time. I would usually take Saturday off, but that was it.

How did you know when it was the right time to quit your job and dive in?

I was dedicated to getting my savings account to a certain place before quitting. That, and I wanted to get funded before launching. I know that isn’t traditional for a lot of risk-taking entrepreneurs, but I think everyone needs to do their own math. We ended up raising $500,000 right before we launched.

Learn more about Doshi and her company, Rank & Style, on OPEN Forum.

Joy Chen, CEO of all-nautral beauty line Yes to, spoke with Entrepreneur.com about how she turned around the formerly flailing company into a brand worth $50 million — four times the value when she joined in 2009.

Q: Before you took the CEO seat, how was the company’s model failing?


A: I walked into the business when it was in the worst state. It wasn’t profitable.

Initially, the Yes to company had three sub-brands — Yes to Carrots, Yes to Tomatoes and Yes to Cucumbers — and all three were cannibalizing each other. It confused people, as the product packaging didn’t communicate each line’s health benefits. So consumers thought it was just about differences in scents or flavors. As a result, each sub-brand chipped at each other’s market share. But I saw this as a clear opportunity for a turnaround. … Consumers can now view the sub-families as ingredients for a natural recipe, where each product solves a problem. 

Read more inspiring insights from Chen on Entrepreneur.com.

How a bad haircut inspired Melody McCloskey to found a StyleSeat, an app worth $300 million.

How a bad haircut inspired Melody McCloskey to found a StyleSeat, an app worth $300 million.

Women are starting businesses faster than ever, despite institutional barriers. This infographic explains why that’s great news for everyone.

Women are starting businesses faster than ever, despite institutional barriers. This infographic explains why that’s great news for everyone.

In “Rookies,” a new series on OPEN Forum, we profile business owners as they navigate the ups and downs of starting a business for the first time. Our first profile features Mackenzie Farquer of Lockwood, a lifestyle shop in Astoria:

"I was living in this neighborhood that was really underserved. There was nowhere to shop: no gift store, boutique, clothing store. I would always tell people at cocktail parties, ‘I’m going to open a store in Astoria.’ I don’t think they believed me."

Via OPENForum.com: “Rookies: How Mackenzi Farquer Went From Stockbroker to Store Owner

Though women are starting businesses faster than ever before, “women-owned businesses employ only 6 percent of the U.S. workforce and account for just 4 percent of revenues.”
Here are the barriers to growth that women entrepreneurs are facing today.
Via OPENForum.com: “3 Ways to Increase Women Entrepreneurship Worldwide”

Though women are starting businesses faster than ever before, “women-owned businesses employ only 6 percent of the U.S. workforce and account for just 4 percent of revenues.”

Here are the barriers to growth that women entrepreneurs are facing today.

Via OPENForum.com: “3 Ways to Increase Women Entrepreneurship Worldwide

Meet the women who are leading the next generation of women in tech.