Posts tagged nasdaq

nasdaq:


Three Things I learned From Warren Buffett,” by Bill Gates:
 (1) It’s not just about investing. (2) Use your platform. (3) Know how valuable your time is. 
Read the whole column here – it’s worth it: http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20130612065727-251749025-three-things-i-ve-learned-from-warren-buffett

Advice from Warren Buffett to Bill Gates? We’ll take it!

nasdaq:

Three Things I learned From Warren Buffett,” by Bill Gates:


(1) It’s not just about investing.
(2) Use your platform.
(3) Know how valuable your time is.

Read the whole column here – it’s worth it: http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20130612065727-251749025-three-things-i-ve-learned-from-warren-buffett

Advice from Warren Buffett to Bill Gates? We’ll take it!

nasdaq:


Under30CEO has compiled a terrific list of the 26 books every entrepreneur should read – including a few of our particular favorites, like Eric Reis’ The Lean Startup and Guy Kawasaki’s The Art of the Start. How many of these books have you read, and which one is next on your list? Check out the full list here.

A great book list that all entrepreneurs should check out!

nasdaq:

Under30CEO has compiled a terrific list of the 26 books every entrepreneur should read – including a few of our particular favorites, like Eric Reis’ The Lean Startup and Guy Kawasaki’s The Art of the Start. How many of these books have you read, and which one is next on your list? Check out the full list here.

A great book list that all entrepreneurs should check out!

nasdaq:


This morning’s advice is courtesy of Robert LoCascio, founder and chief executive of LivePerson.  Check out all of LoCascio’s wisdom over at the New York Times’ Corner Office series, here.

nasdaq:

This morning’s advice is courtesy of Robert LoCascio, founder and chief executive of LivePerson.  Check out all of LoCascio’s wisdom over at the New York Times’ Corner Office series, here.

NASDAQ on Tumblr: Learn the Lingo -- Quickly

nasdaq:

Like any other discipline, entrepreneurship has its own lingo, and parsing that jargon can be tough for the newcomer. What to do? Via Mashable, a solution: Smart-flashcard maker Brainscape has released a deck specially designed for the bewildered startup novice. Even better, it’s a way to…

nasdaq:

Who’s the greatest innovator of all time? Despite their fondness for smartphones and social networking, young Americans still say it’s the guy largely responsible for electric lighting.
That’s just one conclusion from this year’s Lemelson-MIT Innovation Index, which surveys Americans 16 to 25 and gauges their attitudes to invention. This year’s results also suggest they’d like more opportunities to hone their abilities in the area: 80% expressed interest in courses or training to hone their creativity. (h/t Mashable)

nasdaq:

Who’s the greatest innovator of all time? Despite their fondness for smartphones and social networking, young Americans still say it’s the guy largely responsible for electric lighting.

That’s just one conclusion from this year’s Lemelson-MIT Innovation Index, which surveys Americans 16 to 25 and gauges their attitudes to invention. This year’s results also suggest they’d like more opportunities to hone their abilities in the area: 80% expressed interest in courses or training to hone their creativity. (h/t Mashable)

NASDAQ on Tumblr: A big year for startups, web and otherwise

nasdaq:

While we’re on the topic of investors: 2011 was a big year for funding, according to the latest MoneyTree report (authored quarterly by PWC and the National Venture Capital Association, via GigaOm). VCs invested $28.4 billion in 3,673 deals in 2011. That’s 22% more cash than 2010. Many…

Reports on the economy go up and down, but it’s great to see there’s hope for entrepreneurs. Been sitting on an idea for a business? No time to launch your startup like the present.

nasdaq:

thebusinessofbusiness:

Innovate, go beyond the obvious!

Tony Fadell, former Senior Vice President of the iPod Division at Apple Inc, launched Nest and he explains his clever, high-tech, smartphone-inspired thermostat.

Lessons on how to innovate:

1. think about design

2. bring it online

3. make it self-learning and adaptive to customer behavior

4. make it environmental friendly

Nest is an interesting case study for a lot of reasons. For one thing, it demonstrates how a new technologies and even attitudes can translate from industry to industry. Could it also be a bellweather for how advances in computing technology might alter the energy space?

Don’t start a company just for the sake of starting a company. Don’t start a company because it’s cool. Don’t start one because you think it’s going to turn out like it does in the fictional movies, because it won’t - death is the default for startups. Don’t start a company because you want to be like the founders you see at startup school, or want to be the “next [fill in the blank].

PG (via brycedotvc)

A lesson from Startup School: Start a company because “you’ve found your mission.” No other reason will do.

(via nasdaq)

NASDAQ on Tumblr: Five Things You Probably Didn't Know About Zynga

nasdaq:

1. The company was named for CEO Mark Pincus’ beloved American bulldog, whom you might recognize from the logo. Though its namesake has passed away, employees are encouraged to bring their pups to work.

2. The company reached the 100-million-user mark after just two and a half years.

3. As of summer 2011, American FarmVille users outnumber American farmers five to one.

4. Zynga’s approach to charity is typically playful: Users can purchase game-boosting, limited-edition virtual goods, and the proceeds are donated. Offering items such as a never-withering daikon radish, the company raised more than $3 million for Japanese earthquake relief.

5. DreamWorks Animation CEO (and Zynga board member) Jeffrey Katzenberg says that if he had to start his career all over again, he’d want to be Mark Pincus.

How Decentralization and Tinkering Own the Future of Innovation

nasdaq:

The creative processes developed and nurtured by the tech world are spreading to new sectors, according to MIT Media Lab director Joichi Ito. (You could say they’re going viral.) He explains, “The compass has replaced the map, and ‘rough consensus and running code’ has become the fundamental philosophy for the so-called lean start-up movement.” But while this open, fast-and-loose style of development was once limited to Internet startups, technologies like 3D printing are rapidly putting it within reach of hardware makers and setting up for a new startup boom.