Posts tagged Women in Business

Sarika Doshi, a co-founder of the fashion and beauty website Rank & Style, shared some insight into how she launched her company while still working a full-time job:

It was a lot of work. I was working at a legal startup that was doing really interesting things, and I was learning so much, so it really wasn’t a drag. Basically I would work during the day, and then Pooja and Sonal would come over at night. We would order food and then start our second shift, building Rank & Style. It was like being in full-on final exam mode all the time. I would usually take Saturday off, but that was it.
How did you know when it was the right time to quit your job and dive in?
I was dedicated to getting my savings account to a certain place before quitting. That, and I wanted to get funded before launching. I know that isn’t traditional for a lot of risk-taking entrepreneurs, but I think everyone needs to do their own math. We ended up raising $500,000 right before we launched.

Learn more about Doshi and her company, Rank & Style, on OPEN Forum.

Sarika Doshi, a co-founder of the fashion and beauty website Rank & Style, shared some insight into how she launched her company while still working a full-time job:

It was a lot of work. I was working at a legal startup that was doing really interesting things, and I was learning so much, so it really wasn’t a drag. Basically I would work during the day, and then Pooja and Sonal would come over at night. We would order food and then start our second shift, building Rank & Style. It was like being in full-on final exam mode all the time. I would usually take Saturday off, but that was it.

How did you know when it was the right time to quit your job and dive in?

I was dedicated to getting my savings account to a certain place before quitting. That, and I wanted to get funded before launching. I know that isn’t traditional for a lot of risk-taking entrepreneurs, but I think everyone needs to do their own math. We ended up raising $500,000 right before we launched.

Learn more about Doshi and her company, Rank & Style, on OPEN Forum.

Women entrepreneurs are on the rise: “The number of women-owned companies increased by 59 percent, while revenues from those companies grew by 63 percent,” according to a recent American Express study.

Kara Goldin of Hint Water, Tory Burch’s eponymous fashion line and Sara Blakely of SPANX are just a few of the women who are leading this new wave of entrepreneurship.

Via OPENForum.com: “The Next Chapter: Women Entrepreneurs Making History Today

forbes:

No. 35 on FORBES’ Power Women list in 2013, Mary Barra named GM’s first female CEO. She will become GM’s CEO on January 15, 2014.

forbes:

No. 35 on FORBES’ Power Women list in 2013, Mary Barra named GM’s first female CEO. She will become GM’s CEO on January 15, 2014.

theatlantic:

There Is, Apparently, a Shoe Ceiling

Today in shoesplaining: Until your career is at its height, ladies, maybe you should keep your heels low. 
Read more.


How does wearing heels affect a woman’s career? This article investigates the age old question of what women should or should not wear to work.

theatlantic:

There Is, Apparently, a Shoe Ceiling

Today in shoesplaining: Until your career is at its height, ladies, maybe you should keep your heels low. 

Read more.

How does wearing heels affect a woman’s career? This article investigates the age old question of what women should or should not wear to work.

I dropped out of many colleges. I just didn’t like school. I’m a poster child for not doing things in a careful way, which is actually my biggest suggestion for burgeoning entrepreneurs. You can’t sit down and predict. When you do that too literally, you will lose out on the kind of intuitive journey that allows you to reach a passionate livelihood.

Sandy Chilewich, founder of Chilewich and co-founder of HUE, a company valued at $40 million dollars

Read more on how Sandy Chilewich’s novel approaches to fashion and fabrication have earned her an enviable design empire.

nprfreshair:

The discussion continues: can women “have it all?” Should women want to “have it all?” What does that really mean?
Today President of Barnard College Debora Spar tackles this question in her book “Wonder Women: Sex, Power, and the Quest for Perfection.”
Spar said that this quest for perfection, “drains the energy out of the broader social goals [of feminism] and it makes women nuts. “
photo via The Atlantic 

An eye-opening report from July shows that women are falling behind men when it comes to entrepreneurship. We look at the numbers and possible reasons to what is stopping women from “having it all.”

nprfreshair:

The discussion continues: can women “have it all?” Should women want to “have it all?” What does that really mean?

Today President of Barnard College Debora Spar tackles this question in her book “Wonder Women: Sex, Power, and the Quest for Perfection.”


Spar said that this quest for perfection, “drains the energy out of the broader social goals [of feminism] and it makes women nuts. “

photo via The Atlantic

An eye-opening report from July shows that women are falling behind men when it comes to entrepreneurship. We look at the numbers and possible reasons to what is stopping women from “having it all.”

Sheryl Sandberg is a good example of balancing strength and warmth—she is hard-charging and gets things done, but in public, she’s almost always smiling and happy too. She’s also done a tremendous service by reinvigorating the conversation about women in the workplace. She undercuts her own argument in one key spot: In Lean In, she writes, “If a woman is competent, she does not seem nice enough. If a woman seems really nice, she is considered more nice than competent.”
Empowering women with practical skills and a network of support just makes sense. Our opportunity in terms of driving innovation in the world today comes from pooling the potential of the full population, not just 50% of it.

says Gina Bianchini, founder and CEO of Mightybell and co-founder of Lean In, who is helping a new generation of women business leaders.
(via fastcompany)

A recent survey of 1,000 female entrepreneurs reveals their biggest challenge is not having the help they need. Bravo Bianchini for providing the continued support that women in business need to thrive. But how far have we really come since “The Feminine Mystique”?

theatlantic:

Why Women Prefer Working Together (and Why Men Prefer Working Alone)

One of the puzzles of the persistent gender wage gap is why women are highly overrepresented in certain fields, like the nonprofit sector, and hugely underrepresented in other fields, like financial institutions and executive positions in major companies. One reasonable question to ask about the gap is: How much should we blame “the system” (i.e.: clubby nepotism, sexism, lack of paternity leave) and how much should we chalk this up to women’s decisions (i.e.: leaning out in their late 20s and choosing careers that pay less even when they had options to earn more).
Peter J. Kuhn and Marie-Claire Villeval wade into this contentious field with a new study: "Are Women More Attracted to Cooperation Than Men?" The short answer is, well, yes. The more complex answer is: Yes, because men demonstrate more overconfidence in their own abilities and distrust in their colleagues’ aptitude, except under key situations.
Read more. [Image: AnnieAnniePancake/Flickr]


In the battle of the sexes, women have certain characteristics that make them better leaders, like the study cited by The Atlantic above.
Here are five additional ways that women are more effective bosses than men, and tips on how everyone—men and women—can improve their leadership skills.

theatlantic:

Why Women Prefer Working Together (and Why Men Prefer Working Alone)

One of the puzzles of the persistent gender wage gap is why women are highly overrepresented in certain fields, like the nonprofit sector, and hugely underrepresented in other fields, like financial institutions and executive positions in major companies. One reasonable question to ask about the gap is: How much should we blame “the system” (i.e.: clubby nepotism, sexism, lack of paternity leave) and how much should we chalk this up to women’s decisions (i.e.: leaning out in their late 20s and choosing careers that pay less even when they had options to earn more).

Peter J. Kuhn and Marie-Claire Villeval wade into this contentious field with a new study: "Are Women More Attracted to Cooperation Than Men?" The short answer is, well, yes. The more complex answer is: Yes, because men demonstrate more overconfidence in their own abilities and distrust in their colleagues’ aptitude, except under key situations.

Read more. [Image: AnnieAnniePancake/Flickr]

In the battle of the sexes, women have certain characteristics that make them better leaders, like the study cited by The Atlantic above.

Here are five additional ways that women are more effective bosses than men, and tips on how everyone—men and women—can improve their leadership skills.

Women are “more astute about knowing how to activate passion in their employees. They watch the 43 muscles in your face and see how your emotions change.”

Jay Forte, author of Fire Up! Your Employees and Smoke Your Competition

Why is being able to activate passion an important skill for everyone? Passion builds loyalty. Motivate your employees, and they’ll in turn be passionate about your product or service and company.

Read more on the 5 ways women are better bosses than men.