Posts tagged New Yorker

Why Does Summer Make Us Lazy?

newyorker:

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Maria Konnikova on humidity, productivity, and the link between sunshine and happiness: http://nyr.kr/16VABHX

“In a 2013 study of perceived well-being, the economist Marie Connolly found that on days when the temperature rose above ninety degrees, the negative impact on happiness levels was greater than the consequences of being widowed or divorced.”

Illustration by Edwin Fotheringham.

Not only does the summer heat make us lazy and cranky, but it is almost impossible to focus when daydreaming of beach weekends. Here are 6 ways to be happier and more productive while you are in the office this summer.

newyorker:

A summer cartoon by Christopher Weyant. For cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/15YoucX

Summer is here (see the above New Yorker cartoon for proof) and it’s next to impossible to stay productive after the 4th of July vacation.
This week use these 12 productivity tips, from Eric Schmidt to Danny Meyer, on how super successful, super busy entrepreneurs organize their day.

newyorker:

A summer cartoon by Christopher Weyant. For cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/15YoucX

Summer is here (see the above New Yorker cartoon for proof) and it’s next to impossible to stay productive after the 4th of July vacation.

This week use these 12 productivity tips, from Eric Schmidt to Danny Meyer, on how super successful, super busy entrepreneurs organize their day.

The New Yorker: Shouts & Murmurs: The Collected Letters of Marissa Mayer and David Karp

newyorker:

My darling David,

Don’t let these earthly considerations stand in the way of our relationship. Getting to know Tumblr has been the biggest joy of my life. I have never felt so young, so alive, so full of hope for the future as when I am watching your metrics rise exponentially each day.

Oh, I…

A hilarious faux email exchange between David Karp and Marissa Mayer on the Tumblr and Yahoo merger from The New Yorker.

Read more on why so many partnerships end in disaster on OPEN Forum.

There’s No Place Like Work!

newyorker:

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Bob Mankoff tested Yahoo C.E.O. Marissa Mayer’s policy of banning working from home by convening all of our cartoonists together in the office. It didn’t really work out: http://nyr.kr/YAQpNH

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newyorker:

Cartoon by Peter C. Vey. For more from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/WUPvLj

Office hierarchy per usual.

newyorker:

Cartoon by Peter C. Vey. For more from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/WUPvLj

Office hierarchy per usual.


"A daydream, in this sense, is just a means of eavesdropping on those novel thoughts generated by the unconscious. We think we’re wasting time, but, actually, an intellectual fountain really is spurting."

Jonah Lehrer dives into the virtues of letting your mind wander, and why psychologists and neuroscientists have recently deemed a seemingly useless activity as a valuable cognitive tool.
Photo credit: Stockbyte/Thinkstock
(via Why Daydreaming Makes You Smarter and More Creative : The New Yorker )

"A daydream, in this sense, is just a means of eavesdropping on those novel thoughts generated by the unconscious. We think we’re wasting time, but, actually, an intellectual fountain really is spurting."

Jonah Lehrer dives into the virtues of letting your mind wander, and why psychologists and neuroscientists have recently deemed a seemingly useless activity as a valuable cognitive tool.

Photo credit: Stockbyte/Thinkstock

(via Why Daydreaming Makes You Smarter and More Creative : The New Yorker )


"Brainstorming seems like an ideal technique, a feel-good way to boost productivity. But there is a problem with brainstorming. It doesn’t work."

Jonah Lehrer on the truth behind the brainstorming fad.
(via Brainstorming Doesn’t Really Work : The New Yorker)

"Brainstorming seems like an ideal technique, a feel-good way to boost productivity. But there is a problem with brainstorming. It doesn’t work."

Jonah Lehrer on the truth behind the brainstorming fad.

(via Brainstorming Doesn’t Really Work : The New Yorker)

Streaming Dreams

YouTube was created by three former employees of PayPal, in a Silicon Valley garage, in early 2005. According to two of the founders, Chad Hurley and Steven Chen, a graphic designer and a software engineer, respectively, the idea grew out of a dinner party at Chen’s home in San Francisco, in the winter of 2004-05. Guests had made videos of one another, but they couldn’t share them easily. The founders envisioned a video version of Flickr, a popular photo-sharing site. All the content on the site would be user-generated: “Real personal clips that are taken by everyday people,” as Hurley described his vision.