Posts tagged NY Times

“When there’s less time to work, you waste less time. When you have a compressed workweek, you tend to focus on what’s important. Constraining time encourages quality time.”
        (via Be More Productive. Shorten the Workweek. - NYTimes.com)
“When there’s less time to work, you waste less time. When you have a compressed workweek, you tend to focus on what’s important. Constraining time encourages quality time.

(via Be More Productive. Shorten the Workweek. - NYTimes.com)

Why Is It So Hard to Find Good Job Candidates?

“I’d been interviewing for this position for three months — off LinkedIn, Craigslist, and a variety of places,” said Ms. Shaw. But she found her hire more serendipitously.

YogaFit owner Beth Shaw recently hired an employee her COO met at a dog park. Do you have trouble finding stellar job candidates?

"Could These Start-Ups Become The Next Big Thing?"

nasdaq:

Pinterest, Dropbox, Pinwheel … there are a lot of good candidates out there under the category of ‘next success of Facebook-esque proportions.’ What’s your pick? 

Fall in love, certainly. But a wonderful product or service won’t make up for bad decisions and deficiencies in marketing, management or finance. Being a successful entrepreneur means being a competent entrepreneur, in addition to being the best baker, computer programmer, picture framer, hairstylist or whatever it is you are.

In business, as in a marriage, there should be defined roles and boundaries.

Doing business with a loved one (or anyone) can be tricky. Avoid rocking the boat with these pointers from long-time couple, and business partners, Dennis Seaman and Quincy Yu.
(via How to be business partners with your spouse — and not kill your marriage - The Washington Post )

In business, as in a marriage, there should be defined roles and boundaries.

Doing business with a loved one (or anyone) can be tricky. Avoid rocking the boat with these pointers from long-time couple, and business partners, Dennis Seaman and Quincy Yu.

(via How to be business partners with your spouse — and not kill your marriage - The Washington Post )

Here is the real secret: passion is critical, but it can’t make up for deficiencies in the other categories. I have seen many people fail in business, and they were all passionate. It is not enough.

We often post quotes of notable entrepreneurs toting that passion is the lifeblood of business. Here, Jay Goltz begs to differ, and argues why a combination of factors—not just one—will help your company grow and flourish.

Ten Reasons Small Businesses Fail to Grow - NYTimes.com

Not firing people does not make you nicer than I am. It just makes you irresponsible, and your customers and your other employees pay the price.

Jay Goltz hiring, firing and being the boss.

Do Good Bosses Have to Have to Be Cut-Throat? - NYTimes.com

Choosing entrepreneurship might be one of the most simple and pure adventures you can take. No permission needed, no essays to write, no tests to take, no interviews to get through, no one to tell you what to do or what not to do — and of course no one else to take the credit or blame.

You need only the possibly crazy notion that someone wants to pay you money for your goods or services — and the guts to quit your job, sign the lease, borrow some money, spend the money and tell your spouse, parents, and/or parole officer. For some, this is invigorating. For others it is intimidating. It can be both. Certainly, it is very different from the more predictable paths of going to graduate school or getting a job.

Occupy Wall Street meets college campuses. “I teach financial markets, and it’s a little like teaching R.O.T.C. during the Vietnam War,” said Robert J. Shiller, a professor at Yale. 
(via At Top Colleges, Anti-Wall St. Fervor Complicates Recruiting - NYTimes.com)

Occupy Wall Street meets college campuses. “I teach financial markets, and it’s a little like teaching R.O.T.C. during the Vietnam War,” said Robert J. Shiller, a professor at Yale. 

(via At Top Colleges, Anti-Wall St. Fervor Complicates Recruiting - NYTimes.com)

Amazing what you can find when reading the fine print. When asked how Buffett can justify keeping investment secrets, he retorted to NY Times columnist Andrew Sorkin, “How would you feel if you had to announce every story idea you had?” Perhaps true, but “at a time when investors are asking for more and more transparency, there is a sense that the playing field on Wall Street is tilted toward the wealthy,” says Sorkin.
(via One Secret Buffett Gets to Keep - NYTimes.com)
Bubbled up by Percolate

Amazing what you can find when reading the fine print. When asked how Buffett can justify keeping investment secrets, he retorted to NY Times columnist Andrew Sorkin, “How would you feel if you had to announce every story idea you had?” Perhaps true, but “at a time when investors are asking for more and more transparency, there is a sense that the playing field on Wall Street is tilted toward the wealthy,” says Sorkin.

(via One Secret Buffett Gets to Keep - NYTimes.com)

Bubbled up by Percolate