Posts tagged EDUCATION

One of the things that’s going to be huge in the future is the ability to get educated online. That’s a wave that’s going to hit in a major way in the next 20 years, and will be a huge improvement to consumer welfare all around the world.
Click here to embiggen (see full infographic)

Interesting depiction of the education versus experience when it comes to start ups in New York City. The right incubator, office space, or coworking space can make all the difference.

(via Visual.ly)

Click here to embiggen (see full infographic)

Interesting depiction of the education versus experience when it comes to start ups in New York City. The right incubator, office space, or coworking space can make all the difference.

(via Visual.ly)

“In the words of Sir Richard Branson, ‘Screw it, just do it,’” says El Brown, founder of KinderJam, a company that facilitates music and movement-oriented tactile learning programs for children. “That’s what I tell every mother who wants to start a business.”
In just four years, this mompreneur has met Oprah and expanded to 11 states and eight countries. Read more on El Brown’s startup success story on OPEN Forum.

“In the words of Sir Richard Branson, ‘Screw it, just do it,’” says El Brown, founder of KinderJam, a company that facilitates music and movement-oriented tactile learning programs for children. “That’s what I tell every mother who wants to start a business.”

In just four years, this mompreneur has met Oprah and expanded to 11 states and eight countries. Read more on El Brown’s startup success story on OPEN Forum.

Can School Make You A Better Entrepreneur?
        
        One thing all entrepreneurs have in common is a passion for their work. One thing they don’t have in common is their educational background. Read More
        (via Can School Make You a Better Entrepreneur? | Entrepreneur.com)
Can School Make You A Better Entrepreneur?

One thing all entrepreneurs have in common is a passion for their work. One thing they don’t have in common is their educational background. Read More

(via Can School Make You a Better Entrepreneur? | Entrepreneur.com)

Who needs college? Young entrepreneur bets on bright idea for solar energy
Eighteen months ago Eden Full was finishing up her sophomore year at Princeton University. She was on the crew team as a coxswain. She had spent the previous summer in Kenya building an innovative, low-cost contraption to make solar panels more efficient. Full was glowingly successful — the kind of college student who ends up profiled in alumni magazines. But Full had decided to drop out. Read More
(via Who needs college? Young entrepreneur bets on bright idea for solar energy | 89.3 KPCC)

Who needs college? Young entrepreneur bets on bright idea for solar energy

Eighteen months ago Eden Full was finishing up her sophomore year at Princeton University. She was on the crew team as a coxswain. She had spent the previous summer in Kenya building an innovative, low-cost contraption to make solar panels more efficient. Full was glowingly successful — the kind of college student who ends up profiled in alumni magazines. But Full had decided to drop out. Read More

(via Who needs college? Young entrepreneur bets on bright idea for solar energy | 89.3 KPCC)

The Trouble with Measuring Innovation
Measuring innovation—how much is taking place and the value it’s producing—remains a challenge for many companies. The metrics they use to evaluate innovation can sometimes be misleading.
Some metrics, such as the number of new ideas in various stages of development, can overestimate the innovation that is actually taking place inside a company. Other metrics, such as revenue derived from innovations, may not pick up the indirect business value certain ideas create. Read More
(via The Trouble with Measuring Innovation - Deloitte CIO - WSJ - Image source)

The Trouble with Measuring Innovation

Measuring innovation—how much is taking place and the value it’s producing—remains a challenge for many companies. The metrics they use to evaluate innovation can sometimes be misleading.

Some metrics, such as the number of new ideas in various stages of development, can overestimate the innovation that is actually taking place inside a company. Other metrics, such as revenue derived from innovations, may not pick up the indirect business value certain ideas create. Read More

(via The Trouble with Measuring Innovation - Deloitte CIO - WSJ - Image source)

Gen Y Report: Head (North)West, Gen Y!

The stats:

Out of the twenty largest metro areas in the U.S., Seattle came out on top for Gen Y workers. The Rainy City boasts strong wage growth, with a 4.4 percent increase between Q2 2009 and Q2 2012. In addition, they have a high median pay for Gen Y workers at $44,000 and a strong presence of tech firms, including Microsoft, which was ranked as a top employer for Gen Y.

After Seattle, the next top metro in the study was Houston, followed by Minneapolis, Washington DC and Boston. San Francisco has the highest median pay for Gen Y at $51,300 and Riverside, CA had the lowest pay at $33,800. New York suffered from having the longest commute time for Gen Y at 30.6 minutes and Riverside had the shortest at 20 minutes. Washington DC has the highest percentage of Gen Y employees at 26 percent, while Tampa has the lowest at 19 percent. Read More

Be Part of the Maker Revolution

In the early 1980s, the words “personal” and “desktop” revolutionized computing, mostly by massively expanding the number of people who had access to it. The first PCs weren’t more powerful than the industrial mainframes of the day, but they were personal. The real revolution was not the machines themselves, but who could use them and what we did with them. Allowing everyone access to computing unleashed a huge amount of creativity and innovation in software and content, as regular people found ways to apply computing to their own lives.
—Chris Anderson

(via Be Part of the Maker Revolution : Innovation :: American Express OPEN Forum)

Be Part of the Maker Revolution

In the early 1980s, the words “personal” and “desktop” revolutionized computing, mostly by massively expanding the number of people who had access to it. The first PCs weren’t more powerful than the industrial mainframes of the day, but they were personal. The real revolution was not the machines themselves, but who could use them and what we did with them. Allowing everyone access to computing unleashed a huge amount of creativity and innovation in software and content, as regular people found ways to apply computing to their own lives.

Chris Anderson

(via Be Part of the Maker Revolution : Innovation :: American Express OPEN Forum)

[I] believe that the way computers interact with humans will change in 20 years. The idea that we will be walking down the street, typing on a piece of glass [i.e. today’s smartphones] is ridiculous. There is nothing that limits us from someday projecting an image ahead of us through glass or something else and interact with it like Tom Cruise did in Minority Report.
57,321,231,319 Reasons to do Business in NYC (via NYCEDC)