For a select group of socially-conscious business owners, the mark of a successful company isn’t always about profits.

… A growing number of companies have embraced the notion of measuring results through a triple bottom line, which combines the traditional bottom line of profit with additional outputs related to environmental and social returns the business may generate.

We met the people behind four companies that prove making profits and improving society aren’t mutually exclusive

Microsoft pulled support for Windows XP on April 8, 2014, ending the operating systems’ 12-year run. Lynda.com’s obituary on the recently deceased OS remembers the place it held in our homes and offices:

While well-loved, XP was a bit shy. Getting to know it closely required greeting it with a 25 digital alphanumeric code. However, if engaged too frequently XP would often shut down and pout, refusing to cooperate unless you talked to its parents on the phone in Redmond. Windows XP spent much of its life on a quest of rediscovery. Every two or three years, it would go on a spiritual journey of service, packing a care package of renewed faith in the form of three Service Packs—each with things to love, and things to hate. Despite it all, XP always tried its hardest to please.

RIP, XP.

Microsoft pulled support for Windows XP on April 8, 2014, ending the operating systems’ 12-year run. Lynda.com’s obituary on the recently deceased OS remembers the place it held in our homes and offices:

While well-loved, XP was a bit shy. Getting to know it closely required greeting it with a 25 digital alphanumeric code. However, if engaged too frequently XP would often shut down and pout, refusing to cooperate unless you talked to its parents on the phone in Redmond. Windows XP spent much of its life on a quest of rediscovery. Every two or three years, it would go on a spiritual journey of service, packing a care package of renewed faith in the form of three Service Packs—each with things to love, and things to hate. Despite it all, XP always tried its hardest to please.

RIP, XP.

Breakups and flare ups aren’t uncommon in business, but the startup world seems to have had it’s fair share (see Facebook, Snapchat, et. al).
Zipcar is no exception: The Verge’s (thisistheverge) recent feature “Driven: How Zipcar’s founders built and lost a car-sharing empire” describes how the company’s co-founders Antje Danielson and Robin Chase met at their children’s playground and founded the disruptive company, only to fell apart in the boardroom.
We share three lessons we learned about choosing a co-founder from Zipcar on OPEN Forum.

Breakups and flare ups aren’t uncommon in business, but the startup world seems to have had it’s fair share (see Facebook, Snapchat, et. al).

Zipcar is no exception: The Verge’s (thisistheverge) recent feature “Driven: How Zipcar’s founders built and lost a car-sharing empire” describes how the company’s co-founders Antje Danielson and Robin Chase met at their children’s playground and founded the disruptive company, only to fell apart in the boardroom.

We share three lessons we learned about choosing a co-founder from Zipcar on OPEN Forum.


All we do is give, and all you do is take. We give you text posts, delicious food photos, coupons, restaurant recommendations… and what do you do in return? You take them and you hide them from all our friends.

This is just part of a very long breakup letter food delivery service Eat24 penned to Facebook this month. Eat24 cited the social media network’s latest algorithm tweak, which drops business’s (free) organic reach to 1%, as the reason behind why they deleted their Facebook fan page.
But Facebook isn’t the only show in town for businesses wanting to reach their connected consumers. Inc.com has three lessons business owners should take away from Facebook’s “pay-to-play” algorithm. 

All we do is give, and all you do is take. We give you text posts, delicious food photos, coupons, restaurant recommendations… and what do you do in return? You take them and you hide them from all our friends.

This is just part of a very long breakup letter food delivery service Eat24 penned to Facebook this month. Eat24 cited the social media network’s latest algorithm tweak, which drops business’s (free) organic reach to 1%, as the reason behind why they deleted their Facebook fan page.

But Facebook isn’t the only show in town for businesses wanting to reach their connected consumers. Inc.com has three lessons business owners should take away from Facebook’s “pay-to-play” algorithm. 

Making close to $90,000 worth of mistakes has taught the business owners behind J. Paul, a line of skincare products for men, some pretty invaluable lessons. Watch to learn how the team managed to turn their mistakes into teachable moments that strengthened the brand.

Still working on your taxes? There’s still time to catch some of these last-minute tax credits!
Flickr photo: Casey Konstantín

Still working on your taxes? There’s still time to catch some of these last-minute tax credits!

Flickr photo: Casey Konstantín

A new show by Mike Judge captures the self-importance and venture-capital-obsessed culture that Silicon Valley is often stereotyped for. Does HBO’s “Silicon Valley” get it right?

A new show by Mike Judge captures the self-importance and venture-capital-obsessed culture that Silicon Valley is often stereotyped for. Does HBO’s “Silicon Valley” get it right?

A Few Questions You Should Never Ask In An Interview
“How old are you?”
“What is the ethnic origin of your name?”
“If you work full time, who takes care of your children?”
“How many sick days did you take at your last job?”
"Have you ever been arrested?"
"Where did you learn to speak ___?" 
Just… Don’t do it.
Via OPEN Forum’s: “10 Questions You Should Never Ask in an Interview”

A Few Questions You Should Never Ask In An Interview

  1. “How old are you?”
  2. “What is the ethnic origin of your name?”
  3. “If you work full time, who takes care of your children?”
  4. “How many sick days did you take at your last job?”
  5. "Have you ever been arrested?"
  6. "Where did you learn to speak ___?" 

Just… Don’t do it.

Via OPEN Forum’s: “10 Questions You Should Never Ask in an Interview

Open offices are here to stay, even though experts have recently found they actually hurt productivity. See how business owners can keep their employees happy and productive without losing the collaborative benefits of being in an open office on OPEN Forum.

Tweeting may seem simple enough, but these common errors can make your Twitter page seem like an amateur is behind it.